BenTha'er-Horizons

Revolutionary War

Alexander Hamilton

Bob has spoken highly over time of the Ron Chernow biography of Alexander Hamilton. He thoroughly enjoyed this book. I could not get through it, more a timing issue, not enough time I am afraid. Now Hamilton has been redeemed to some respect through a Pulitzer winning Broadway play of that name. This article talks about the play and book. How cool is this information!
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The Death of George Washington

George Washington was a great man and a great servant to this country. We owe him a debt of gratitude to have delivered us our freedom and the United States. I hope we can keep it. I have visited Mount Vernon twice and it was a great experience. Here is a description of the final time of George Washington. Too bad medicine was not more like what we see today. No blood letting allowed.
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The USS Constitution

Along the lines that it is another historical anniversary, it is the United States Navy's 240th anniversary. Six frigates were build to protect our new nation. One of those is the USS Constitution. This frigate has been docked in Boston and they have been working on the appropriate spot to dock her. Bob was able to visit the frigate when we were in Boston in 2012. Here is a lovely photo he took of his visit. Other photos are here.


USS-Constitution
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Hamilton

I missed posting this article a couple of days ago when it was the anniversary of Alexander Hamilton's death. He has been in the news a bit lately but not in a good way. They want to replace him on the $10 bill with a female heroine. It may not happen which would be a good thing since he of all the Founding Fathers had the largest influence over our monetary system and saved the country from debt and financial ruin. On this anniversary, here is a nice article about how his loss was mourned greatly by a dear friend, another Founding Father, Gouverneur Morris. Bob has always commented that one of the best books he has read was Ron Chernow's, Hamilton.It certainly made an impression.
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The Tough Founding Fathers

Who were the toughest, possibly "Don't mess with me" type of Founding Fathers. Who gave their all to the cause even though it was putting their lives on the line. Interesting article in all of this. Who would you pick? Hamilton sticks out.
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Thomas Paine in 1776

On this day in 1776, Thomas Paine wrote his pamphlet, American Crisis. The words were ordered to be read to the troops by George Washington before they crossed the Delaware River to attack Trenton.

“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered. Yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: ’tis dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods, and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as freedom should not be highly rated........
Let it be told to the future world, that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive, the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet it and repulse it.......I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. “Tis the business of little minds to shrink;but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”
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The Tea Party

In 1773, a motley group of individuals called the Mohawks (not the tribe) made their way to the wharf in Boston harbor. They climbed on board the Dartmouth, the Eleanor, and the Beaver, British vessels all and began to toss chests of tea onto the deck, breaking them open and tossing tea into Boston Harbor. I bet this was a bit of cold work (unless they were warmed by alcoholic beverages). King George III was not happy and coaxed the British Government to establish the Intolerable Acts. Things progressed from there and the rest is U.S. history.
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Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr was alternatively an American Statesman, once Vice President of the United States, and an opportunist bordering on traitor. He is well-known for killing Alexander Hamilton in a duel before his life went further into disarray. I came across a short article that gave a synopsis of his history and describes how we as ordinary people in our lives and surroundings may cross paths with parts of history. Sometimes we know it is happening, other times we may be unaware.
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Revolutionary Writings

Thomas Paine (whose name was actually Pain) was an Englishman who came to adopt the fledgling United States as his home. His writings stirred the emotions of average people and patriot leaders. His works helped lead the way to revolution. To read more about him and “Common Sense”, check here.
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Hamilton

One book that Bob enjoyed to read was Ron Chernow’s biography on Alexander Hamilton. A brilliant, yet followed by scandal, individual. He contributed mightily to our country’s founding government and financial status. Here is an interesting short biographical sketch about Alexander Hamilton’s history. Another story about the pistols used in the Hamilton-Burr duel that may have lead to Hamilton’s untimely demise. The pistol may have been a “trick pistol” with a hair trigger.
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